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American Foreign Service High School Essay Contest DEADLINE April 5

Successful essays will identify, in no more than 1,250 words, a situation where diplomats worked on a peacebuilding initiative with partners from the country/region in question, nongovernmental organizations, and other parts of the U.S. government, and then go on to analyze what characteristics and approaches made the enterprise a success.

$2,500 to the writer of the winning essay, in addition to an all-expense paid trip to the nation’s capital from anywhere in the U.S. for the winner and his or her parents, and an all-expense paid educational voyage courtesy of Semester at Sea.

SOURCE: https://www.afsa.org

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Christmas Playtime at the Lockwood-Matthews Mansion Museum November 11-January 3 ~Norwalk, CT~

From 1868 to 1938, children played on the third floor of the Mansion, which was filled with toys and dolls and even featured a theater where they may have performed. This year, after undergoing expert restoration, the Museum’s doll collection along with several vintage toys will be exhibited as part of Christmas Playtime at the Mansion, an exhibition that will recreate those playful times during the Victorian era.

The first floor of the Mansion will feature Christmas trees decorated with period-appropriate ornaments, a dining table adorned with dazzling antique silver and china, several playful dolls and toy vignettes, and sumptuous Victorian gowns curated by Stacey Danielson, with generous loans from the Wilton Historical Society.

SOURCE: https://www.lockwoodmathewsmansion.com

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John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage High School Essay Contest DEADLINE January 15

Describe and analyze an act of political courage by a US elected official who served during or after 1917.

In Profiles in Courage, John F. Kennedy recounted the stories of eight U.S. senators who risked their careers to do what was right for the nation. These leaders demonstrated political courage by taking a stand for the public good in spite of pressure by interest groups, their political party, or even their constituents. The Profile in Courage Essay Contest challenges students to write an original and creative essay that demonstrates an understanding of political courage as described by John F. Kennedy in Profiles in Courage.

The maximum word count is 1,000 with a minimum of 700, not including citations and bibliography. Use at least five varied sources such as government documents, letters, newspaper articles, books, and/or personal interviews.

SOURCE: https://www.jfklibrary.org

Article-a-Day #64: Black America Web-Baseball Legend Larry Doby

Doby, a multi-sport high school athlete in Paterson, N.J., began his pro baseball career with the Negro National League’s Newark Eagles. In July 1947, months after Robinson’s history-making debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Doby made his debut for the Cleveland Indians.

SOURCE: https://blackamericaweb.com

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2021 Martha Washington Hudson Valley Woman of History Award Deadline January 15

Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site is now accepting nominations for the 2021 Martha Washington Woman of History Award. Each year, Washington’s Headquarters selects a recipient for this award, given to a woman who has distinguished herself in the field of Hudson Valley history. The honor is presented at the Site’s annual program, The General’s Lady held in March, during Women’s History Month. The Woman of History award acknowledges Martha Washington’s important place in history as a devoted patriot in support of the American Revolution and the ensuing new nation.

SOURCE: https://parks.ny.gov

Article-a-Day #63: The Moguldom Nation-Hidden In A Huge Texas Subdivision, A Rare Plantation Building Where Slaves Made Sugar

Slavery may have started out relatively small in Texas but it grew to be big business in what is now the Lone Star state.

“The Mexican government was opposed to slavery, but even so, there were 5000 slaves in Texas by the time of the Texas Revolution in 1836. By the time of annexation a decade later, there were 30,000; by 1860, the census found 182,566 slaves — over 30 percent of the total population of the state,” according to the Texas State Library.

Now, a rare plantation building where slaves made sugar has been discovered hidden in a huge Texas subdivision. It is an antebellum sugar purgery.

SOURCE: https://moguldom.com

George S. & Stella M. Knight American Revolution High School Essay Contest DEADLINE December 31

To participate, students must submit an original 800- to 1,200-word essay based on an event, person, philosophy or ideal associated with the American Revolution, Declaration of Independence, or the framing of the United States Constitution. Each student’s essay will be judged based upon its historical accuracy, clarity, organization, grammar and spelling, and documentation.

SOURCE: https://www.sar.org

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World Historian Student Essay Competition for Grades K-12 DEADLINE May 1

The World Historian Student Essay Competition is an international competition open to students enrolled in grades K–12 in public, private, and parochial schools, and those in home-study programs.

The World History Association established this $500 prize to recognize young scholars. A one-year membership in the WHA will also be included with each prize.

Each competitor will submit an essay that addresses the issue: In what way has the study of world history affected my understanding of the world in which I live?

SOURCE: https://www.thewha.org

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Leonard L. Milberg High Junior School Poetry Prize DEADELINE November 27

The Leonard L. Milberg ’53 High School Poetry Prize recognizes outstanding work by student writers in the 11th grade in the U.S. or abroad. Contest judges are poets on the Princeton University Creative Writing faculty.

SOURCE: https://arts.princeton.edu

Article-a-Day #62: Smithsonian-Jim Crow Compounded the Grief of African American Mothers Whose Sons Were Killed in World War I

In the summer of 1930, Mrs. Louise Kimbro, a 57-year-old African American woman from Columbus, Ohio, boarded a train for New York City. She was one of 6,685 women who accepted the government’s invitation to join the Gold Star Mothers and Widows pilgrimage between 1930 and 1933. Her son, Private Martin A. Kimbro, had died of meningitis in May 1919 while serving with a U.S. Army labor battalion in France, and his body lay buried in one of the new overseas military cemeteries. Now she would see his grave for the first time.

The journey was enabled by legislation signed by President Calvin Coolidge on March 2, 1929, just before he left office. It authorized mothers and unmarried widows of deceased American soldiers, sailors, and marines buried in Europe to visit their loved ones’ final resting places. All reasonable expenses for their journey were paid for by the nation.

Newspapers promoted the democratic spirit of the event, reminding the public that all the women, regardless of religion, social status, income, or place of birth, were guests of the U.S. government and would be treated equally. In early 1930, however, President Herbert Hoover’s administration announced that “in the interests of the pilgrims themselves,” the women would be divided into racially separate groups but that “no discrimination whatever will be made.” Every group would receive equal accommodation, care and consideration.

SOURCE: https://www.smithsonianmag.com

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The Society of Classical Poets High School Poetry Competition DEADLINE December 31

Poems must contain meter. Counting the number of syllables and ensuring there are a similar number in each line is sufficient.

SOURCE: https://classicalpoets.org

Article-a-Day #61: Black America Web-Inventor and Scientist Emmett Chappelle

In 1966, Chappelle started a job with NASA in support of the space program’s manned space flight operations. As an exobiologist, Chappelle initially studied organisms before becoming a remote sensing scientist. Chappelle worked for NASA and then the Goddard Space Center until 2001. Along the way, he established 14 patents that have retained their usefulness in modern science.

SOURCE: https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org

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Article-a-Day #60: Black America Web-Phillip Downing Invented the Metal Mailbox

Before 1891, folks who wanted to send a letter would have to visit their local post office to do so. Philip Downing invented a metal mailbox that is the predecessor for the modern version of the ones we use today.

SOURCE: https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org

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Virtual: A Question of Freedom: The Families Who Challenged Slavery from the Nation’s Founding to the Civil War November 30

For over 70 years and five generations, the enslaved families of Prince George’s County, MD, filed hundreds of suits for their freedom against a powerful circle of slaveholders, taking their cause all the way to the Supreme Court. Between 1787 and 1861, these lawsuits challenged the legitimacy of slavery in American law and put slavery on trial in the nation’s capital. William G. Thomas III, history department chairman at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, recounts the story of the longest and most complex legal challenge to slavery in American history.

SOURCE: https://www.archives.gov

This site contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.

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Virtual: Native Communities and the Vote: Teaching about American Indian Voting Rights through Documents November 18

This webinar for educators and learn how to incorporate primary sources related to American Indian voting rights into your lessons…activities and resources from the National Archives, and explore how to include discussions of evolving rights over time as related to Native Communities and the right to participate in Federal elections.

SOURCE: https://www.archives.gov

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Article-a-Day #59: Encyclopedia Virginia-Emanuel Driggus Free Black Man who was Enslaved and Restored Himself to Freedom

Emanuel Driggus was an enslaved man who restored freedom to himself and several members of his family. He exemplifies the possibilities and the limitations that free blacks encountered in seventeenth-century Virginia. Driggus gained his freedom sometime before 1661, and in the 1660s and 1670s integrated himself into the Eastern Shore’s agricultural economy as a horse breeder and tobacco planter. The last mention of Driggus in the Northampton County public records is reference to a debt of several hundred pounds of tobacco that he owed in 1685 to a recently deceased planter.

SOURCE: https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org

Article-a-Day #58: Encyclopedia Virginia-Mark DeMortie Antislavery Republican Party Activist

Mark Renie (or Réné) DeMortie was an antislavery and Republican Party activist. Born with slave status in Norfolk, his enslaver emancipated him in 1850, a few weeks before his twenty-first birthday. He assisted other men and women who fled slavery by way of the Underground Railroad in Virginia.

SOURCE: https://www.encyclopediavirginia.org

Article-a-Day #57: The Moguldom Nation-Former Slave Henrietta Wood Sued for Reparations, and Won

While the case took eight long years to make it to court Wood held steadfast in her fight. And on April 17, 1878, 12 white jurors in a federal courtroom in Cincinnati, Ohio, delivered the verdict. Wood sued Zebulon Ward, a white man who had enslaved her 25 years before. She was seeking $20,000 in reparations.

SOURCE: https://moguldom.com

Article-a-Day #56: Black America Web- Dr. Frederick D. Patterson, Founder of the United Negro College Fund

Dr. Frederick D. Patterson was a veterinarian and educator who made significant contributions to Black collegiate excellence. The founder of the United Negro College Fund was born October 10, 1901.

SOURCE: https://blackamericaweb.com

Article-a-Day #55: Black America Web-Little Known Black History Fact: Eugene Ballard

Eugene Ballard is considered to be the first African-American military pilot, although he never flew for the United States. Known as the “Black Swallow of Death,” the Columbus, Ga. native was born October 9, 1895.

SOURCE: https://blackamericaweb.com