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Article-a-Day #133: How the Smithsonian Can Help African American Families Research Their Ancestors

Found in Yonkers’ Researching Your American Ancestors: A Quick Guide

All services are free and open to anyone at any stage of their research process—not just scholars or genealogy experts.

The staff offers this advice for anyone starting their research:

Start with what you know. Pick the branch of your family you know the most about, because you’ll be more likely to find records and go back farther in time to see how records connect. You may be inclined to start with the gaps in family history, but that can make the process more difficult and frustrating. Talk to your family before you get started to gather as much information as you can before diving in.

Be flexible with spellings, dates and locations. Don’t count out records that might have a family name with a letter off or a year that doesn’t match with the family memory. Data may have been recorded incorrectly, or details may have shifted when told over multiple generations.

Learn about communities, not just individuals. You can understand quite a bit from researching the context of the period and area where your family lived—whether through church documents or local news bulletins—to offer clues and paint a bigger picture.

Try to get as much information from as many sources as possible. In addition to family-history databases online, you can do research in newspapers, court records, and the Freedmen’s Bureau records, which contain details about hundreds of thousands of formerly enslaved people as they transitioned to freedom and citizenship after the Civil War. (Volunteers with the Smithsonian Transcription Center are currently working to make these records more accessible and searchable online.)

Consider print as well as digital. The internet is a powerful tool, but it’s wise to keep paper copies in addition to computer files. Formats might change in the future, and it can be helpful for sharing research across different age groups and technology comfort levels.

Explore free options for research. Ask your public library what resources are available—many now have options you can access from home.

Don’t get discouraged. “Come with a very open mind as to what you might see,” said Lisa Crawley, genealogy reference assistant for the center.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the center has moved to virtual appointments. It also does outreach with organizations and community groups and hosts monthly public programs online. You don’t have to be in Washington, D.C., to participate, and the staff has seen an increase in attendance from across the country.

To schedule a virtual research session or find out about upcoming online programs, email familyhistorycenter@si.edu.

SOURCE: https://www.smithsonianmag.com

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USDA Challenge: Advance Live Animal Diagnostic Tests for the Early Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease PRIZES $170K DEADLINE April 23

Competitive solutions to this challenge shall consist of novel diagnostic tests that are sensitive and specific for CWD, producing timely and repeatable results on samples easily obtained from live deer. Competitive solutions will also be cost-effective and readily manufacturable. The ideal solutions to this challenge are diagnostic tests that would be eligible for approval as an official Chronic Wasting Disease test by the Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), USDA.

Sensis will award prizes valued up to $170,000. The Detect to Protect Challenge: A Live Animal Test is calling upon innovators and scientists, researchers, and/or startup companies to submit their proposal for developing a novel diagnostic test for the early detection of CWD in a live animal, prior to clinical signs.

SOURCE: https://www.cwdchallenge.com/

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Call for Pitches: Transforming Anthropology Research into Comic Forms and Graphic Novels DEADLINE March 15

This summer, the Anthropology News magazine turns comic. We will look at the growing interest in using drawings as ethnographic fieldwork method and the process of transforming research into comic forms and graphic novels. We’ll explore the creative work of anthropologist-cartoonists and imaginative collaborations between anthropologists and cartoonists. From sequential graphic narrative to line to gutter we’ll probe how graphic ethnography can support anthropological analysis, help us tell engaging and challenging anthropology stories to broad publics, and aid us in working through and reflecting on difficult topics and experiences.

We welcome pitches that tell anthropology stories on any topic in comic form or that tell us about the process, possibilities, and challenges of creating comic work. We’re particularly looking to show an international range and reach of graphic ethnography, and seek pieces in full comic-strip form or that use elements of graphic work to tell their stories.

SOURCE: https://www.anthropology-news.org

This site contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.


http://www.entertainmentearth.com/cjdoorway.asp?url=hitlist.asp?company=Bandai

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Pomeroy Fund for New York State History Grants for Museum and Historical Society Capital Budgets DEADLINE March 22

The Pomeroy Fund for NYS History is a partnership between the William G. Pomeroy Foundation and the Museum Association of New York (MANY). The Fund offers grant assistance to 501(c)(3) history-related organizations in New York State with budgets under $150,000.

In Round Four, a total of $50,000 will be distributed for capital needs in individual grants not to exceed $5,000.

Requests will be considered for technology equipment, facility maintenance equipment, furnishings, major material purchases, renovations, refurbishments, remodeling, and rehabilitation.

SOURCE: https://nysmuseums.org

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Virtual: The African American Intellectual History Society’s Sixth Annual Conference March 19-20

Keynote Speakers:

Robin D.G. Kelley and Tiya Miles

Author and historian Robin D.G. Kelley is one of the most distinguished experts on African American studies and a celebrated professor who has lectured at some of America’s highest learning institutions.

Tiya Miles is Professor of History and Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at Harvard University. She is a public historian, academic historian, and creative writer whose work explores the intersections of African American, Native American and women’s histories.

Featured Guest Speakers

Stanley Nelson is among the premier documentary filmmakers working today. His feature-length films combine compelling narratives with rich and deeply researched historical detail, shining new light on both familiar and under-explored aspects of the American past.

Etant Dupain is a journalist, filmmaker, and community organizer. For over a decade, he has worked as a producer on documentaries and for international news media outlets including Al Jazeera, TeleSur, BBC, CNN, Netflix, PBS, and Vice. Etant founded an alternative media project in Haiti to enable citizen journalists to provide access to information in Haitian Creole for and about internally-displaced people, aid accountability, and politics.

Featured Authors & Books

Thavolia Glymph, author of The Women’s Fight: The Civil War’s Battles for Home, Freedom, and Nation

Davarian L. Baldwin, author of In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower: How Universities Are Plundering Our Cities

Tiffany N. Florvil, author of Mobilizing Black Germany: Afro-German Women and the Making of a Transnational Movement

Tyler D. Parry, author of Jumping the Broom: The Surprising Multicultural Origins of a Black Wedding Ritual

William Sturkey, author of Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White

SOURCE: https://www.aaihs.org

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NEH Humanities Historical Research Grants DEADLINE May 18

The Research and Development program supports projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials.

This program supports projects at all stages of development, from early planning and stand-alone studies, to advanced implementation. Research and Development projects contribute to the evolving and expanding body of knowledge for heritage practitioners, and for that reason, outcomes may take many forms. Projects may produce any combination of laboratory datasets, guidelines for standards, open access software tools, workflow and equipment specifications, widely used metadata schema, or other products.

Research and Development supports work on the entire range of humanities collection types including, but not limited to, moving image and sound recordings, archaeological artifacts, born digital and time-based media, rare books and manuscripts, archival records, material culture, and art. Applicants must demonstrate how advances in preservation and access through a Research and Development project would benefit the cultural heritage community by supporting humanities research, teaching, or public programming.

SOURCE: https://www.neh.gov

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NEH Humanities Initiative Grants for Community Colleges DEADLINE May 20

Humanities Initiatives at Community Colleges strengthen the teaching and study of the humanities at community colleges by developing new humanities programs, resources (including those in digital format), or courses, or by enhancing existing ones.

Projects must be organized around a core topic or set of themes drawn from such areas of study in the humanities as history, philosophy, religion, literature, and composition and writing skills.

NEH welcomes applications for projects that are modest in scope, duration, and budget, as well as applications for expansive, long-term projects.

SOURCE: https://www.neh.gov

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NEH Humanities Initiative Grants for Colleges and Universities DEADLINE May 20

Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities strengthen the teaching and study of the humanities at institutions of higher education by developing new humanities programs, resources (including those in digital format), or courses, or by enhancing existing ones.

Projects must be organized around a core topic or set of themes drawn from such areas of study in the humanities as history, philosophy, religion, literature, and composition and writing skills.

NEH welcomes applications for projects that are modest in scope, duration, and budget, as well as applications for expansive, long-term projects.

SOURCE: https://www.neh.gov

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Article-a-Day #132: U.S. History Scene-The Birth of Blackface Minstrelsy and the Rise of Stephen Foster

In 1828, T.D. “Big Daddy” Rice, a struggling white actor, made his New York stage debut. With a single dialectical song performed in blackface, his routine radically transformed the cultural landscape of North America. In 1855, a theater columnist for the New York Tribune would recall that cataclysmic performance as an unparalleled moment in American entertainment as “never was there such an excitement in the musical or dramatic world; nothing was talked of, nothing written of, nothing dreamed of, but ‘Jim Crow.’” Although his name is not known today, T.D. Rice was a major star in Antebellum America. He is considered one of the primary artistic architects of what was called the “minstrel show” or “blackface minstrelsy.”

SOURCE: https://ushistoryscene.com

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Article-a-Day #131: Time-‘The Slaves Dread New Year’s Day the Worst’: The Grim History of January 1

In the African-American community, New Year’s Day used to be widely known as “Hiring Day” — or “Heartbreak Day,” as the African-American abolitionist journalist William Cooper Nell described it — because enslaved people spent New Year’s Eve waiting, wondering if their owners were going to rent them out to someone else, thus potentially splitting up their families. The renting out of slave labor was a relatively common practice in the antebellum South, and a profitable practice for white slave owners and hirers.

SOURCE: https://time.com

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The Adirondack Park Agency: Public Comments Sought on Expanding Hinckley Day Use Area DEADLINE March 19 ~New York~

The Adirondack Park Agency (APA) is accepting public comments on Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan conformance for proposed amendments to the Hinckley Day Use Area Unit Management Plan (UMP).

The public comment period will run through March 19th, 2021. Public comments should address if the proposed activities conform to the guidelines and criteria of the Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan (APSLMP).

SOURCE: https://www.newyorkalmanack.com

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Maple SugarFest 2021 March 13 ~Mount Kisco, NY~

Explore the harvesting and processing techniques used by the Native Americans and early colonists. Please come relive what it was like to make maple syrup in the 1800s and learn about the biology behind it! Discover the internal and external factors that contribute to sap production unique to North American Sugar Maple Trees.

SOURCE: https://www.westmorelandsanctuary.org

Location: Westmoreland Sanctuary, 260 Chestnut Ridge Road, Mount Kisco, NY

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Article-a-Day #130: The Philadelphia Inquirer-Pennsylvania officially abolished slavery in 1780. But many black Pennsylvanians were in bondage long after that

Although Pennsylvania would be heralded throughout history for its bold stand, freedom here didn’t arrive categorically. The Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery allowed the institution to survive, in various guises, for decades.

Enslaved people born even the day before passage could still be kept in bondage for life. The last enslaved Pennsylvanians wouldn’t be freed until 1847.

SOURCE: https://www.inquirer.com

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Article-a-Day #129: The Battle of Nashville and the Role of Williamson County’s US Colored Troop Veterans

The Battle of Nashville was important because the ultimate US victory marked the end of significant fighting in the Western Theatre of the Civil War by crushing the Confederate Army of Tennessee. This left the region in US hands for the remainder of the war. But it was also significant because it is one of the few major battles in which whole regiments of black men were used as a fighting force. Previously, they had primarily been used in ancillary or support capacities during the War and only had generally seen action when attacked in pursuit of those duties. At the Battle of Nashville, many of these men were sent to fight offensively for the first time – and they performed admirably. The men of the 13th USCI, in particular, were placed in a very difficult position and they suffered very heavy casualties despite heroic efforts on the battlefield.

SOURCE: https://usctwillcotn.blogspot.com

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Article-a-Day #128: The Atlantic- The War on Black-Owned Bookstores

Perhaps most disturbing, Hoover wanted the Bureau to convince African American citizens (presumably with pay or through extortion) to spy on these stores by posing as sympathetic customers or activists. “Investigations should be instituted on new stores when opened and you should recognize the excellent target these stores represent for penetration by racial sources,” he ordered. Hoover, in short, expected agents to adopt the ruthless tactics of espionage and falsification they deployed against civil-rights and Black Power activists, and now use them against black-owned bookstores.

SOURCE: https://www.theatlantic.com

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The anthropology magazine SAPIENS is taking submissions

SAPIENS magazine publishes on anthropological research, discoveries, and insights…SAPIENS is free and open to anyone with an internet connection. To date, SAPIENS has been read more than 10 million times in 222 countries and territories.

SOURCE: https://www.sapiens.org

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Virtual: Take a Virtual Field Trip to the Iroquois Indian Museum through June 30, 2021

In this 45-minute program, Iroquois educator Brenda LaForme will introduce students to her culture, history and traditions. Participants will explore the Clan system and the formation of the Iroquois Confederacy – the oldest still operating democracy in human history. Students will also discover the role of Iroquois women, investigate the importance of the environment to Native peoples, and more. Concepts will be illustrated with artwork and artifacts from the Museum’s collection and Brenda’s live commentary. Brenda will also conduct a post-lesson question-and-answer session with students.

Cost of Lesson: $125 Reduced to $75 for the 2020 school year.

SOURCE: https://www.iroquoismuseum.org

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Article-a-Day #127: I Love Ancestry- Walter Plecker, a member of the Eugenics movement had an agenda targeted at “Indians”, mixed-race individuals and Blacks in the State of Virginia

Walter Plecker was a member of the Eugenics movement, and Plecker had an agenda targeted at “Indians”, mixed-race individuals and Blacks in the State of Virginia. Plecker intentionally attempted to eliminate any evidence of any “Indians” in the State of Virginia, in order to purify the “white race”.

Walter Plecker modified birth records in the State of Virginia, I learned that in some cases Plecker actually ordered any documentation record on any individual that indicated “Indian” destroyed, as well, Plecker threatened midwives that indicated “Indian” as the race on the birth certificate.

SOURCE: https://iloveancestry.com

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Virtual: Hamburg Games Conference March 16 & 17

The First Multiplayer Online Conference. With the most advanced digital event framework in the world you are able to showcase your product to hundreds of B2B partners. Attendees can explore with their virtual avatar on a vivid conference. No installer needed – all playable in browser. On 2 days we will stream selected talks and panels about our main topic for 2021: Discoverability. International speakers will share their knowledge with the audience and are there for Q&A.

SOURCE: https://www.gamesconference.com

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Sustain our Great Lakes Request for Proposal DEADLINE April 20

The Sustain Our Great Lakes (SOGL) program is soliciting proposals to benefit fish, wildlife, habitat and water quality in the Great Lakes basin. The program will award approximately $8.5 million in grants in 2021 to improve and enhance: 1) stream, riparian and coastal habitats; 2) water quality in the Great Lakes and its tributaries, including a new focal area within Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan Watershed. The program is administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) in partnership with ArcelorMittal, General Mills, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S.D.A. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and U.S.D.A. Natural Resources Conservation Service. Significant program funding is provided by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), a federal program designed to protect, restore and enhance the Great Lakes ecosystem.

SOURCE: https://www.nfwf.org