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Virtual: City Verses-FREE Adult Poetry and Jazz Class Beginning March 24

Make your voice heard with poetry and jazz!

Unlock the connection between poetry and jazz in this free City Verses workshop for adults 18+. In NJPAC’s online classroom, we’ll explore blues, lineage and the work of Black female poets. We’ll read poems, talk about them and write our own. And of course, we’ll set the mood with some great music!

SOURCE: https://www.njpac.org

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Article-a-Day #133: How the Smithsonian Can Help African American Families Research Their Ancestors

Found in Yonkers’ Researching Your American Ancestors: A Quick Guide

All services are free and open to anyone at any stage of their research process—not just scholars or genealogy experts.

The staff offers this advice for anyone starting their research:

Start with what you know. Pick the branch of your family you know the most about, because you’ll be more likely to find records and go back farther in time to see how records connect. You may be inclined to start with the gaps in family history, but that can make the process more difficult and frustrating. Talk to your family before you get started to gather as much information as you can before diving in.

Be flexible with spellings, dates and locations. Don’t count out records that might have a family name with a letter off or a year that doesn’t match with the family memory. Data may have been recorded incorrectly, or details may have shifted when told over multiple generations.

Learn about communities, not just individuals. You can understand quite a bit from researching the context of the period and area where your family lived—whether through church documents or local news bulletins—to offer clues and paint a bigger picture.

Try to get as much information from as many sources as possible. In addition to family-history databases online, you can do research in newspapers, court records, and the Freedmen’s Bureau records, which contain details about hundreds of thousands of formerly enslaved people as they transitioned to freedom and citizenship after the Civil War. (Volunteers with the Smithsonian Transcription Center are currently working to make these records more accessible and searchable online.)

Consider print as well as digital. The internet is a powerful tool, but it’s wise to keep paper copies in addition to computer files. Formats might change in the future, and it can be helpful for sharing research across different age groups and technology comfort levels.

Explore free options for research. Ask your public library what resources are available—many now have options you can access from home.

Don’t get discouraged. “Come with a very open mind as to what you might see,” said Lisa Crawley, genealogy reference assistant for the center.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the center has moved to virtual appointments. It also does outreach with organizations and community groups and hosts monthly public programs online. You don’t have to be in Washington, D.C., to participate, and the staff has seen an increase in attendance from across the country.

To schedule a virtual research session or find out about upcoming online programs, email familyhistorycenter@si.edu.

SOURCE: https://www.smithsonianmag.com

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Virtual: New York State Organics Summit April 13-15

This yearly event is an opportunity to connect with over 175 materials management professionals from New York State and beyond to share success stories and discuss creative solutions to barriers that restrict the sustainable management of organic materials, with a specific focus on wasted food and food scraps.

  • Preparing for the NYS Food Donation & Food Scraps Recycling law
  • Further developing the organics recycling industry and compost markets
  • Discussing major trends and issues in the organics recycling industry
  • Diversifying voices in the organics management industry
  • Discussing the relevance of climate change and organics management
  • Virtually connecting and maintaining relationships

SOURCE: https://www.nysar3.org

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USDA Challenge: Advance Live Animal Diagnostic Tests for the Early Detection of Chronic Wasting Disease PRIZES $170K DEADLINE April 23

Competitive solutions to this challenge shall consist of novel diagnostic tests that are sensitive and specific for CWD, producing timely and repeatable results on samples easily obtained from live deer. Competitive solutions will also be cost-effective and readily manufacturable. The ideal solutions to this challenge are diagnostic tests that would be eligible for approval as an official Chronic Wasting Disease test by the Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), USDA.

Sensis will award prizes valued up to $170,000. The Detect to Protect Challenge: A Live Animal Test is calling upon innovators and scientists, researchers, and/or startup companies to submit their proposal for developing a novel diagnostic test for the early detection of CWD in a live animal, prior to clinical signs.

SOURCE: https://www.cwdchallenge.com/

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Call for Pitches: Transforming Anthropology Research into Comic Forms and Graphic Novels DEADLINE March 15

This summer, the Anthropology News magazine turns comic. We will look at the growing interest in using drawings as ethnographic fieldwork method and the process of transforming research into comic forms and graphic novels. We’ll explore the creative work of anthropologist-cartoonists and imaginative collaborations between anthropologists and cartoonists. From sequential graphic narrative to line to gutter we’ll probe how graphic ethnography can support anthropological analysis, help us tell engaging and challenging anthropology stories to broad publics, and aid us in working through and reflecting on difficult topics and experiences.

We welcome pitches that tell anthropology stories on any topic in comic form or that tell us about the process, possibilities, and challenges of creating comic work. We’re particularly looking to show an international range and reach of graphic ethnography, and seek pieces in full comic-strip form or that use elements of graphic work to tell their stories.

SOURCE: https://www.anthropology-news.org

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National Science Foundation Community College STEM Solutions Challenge DEADLINE April 20

The Virtual Innovation Boot Camp provides professional development, mentoring, and coaching designed to build strategic communication and entrepreneurial skills to help students advance their innovations in both the private and public sectors. The Boot Camp culminates in a virtual poster session and engagement opportunity with STEM leaders and Congressional stakeholders, and a pitch presentation in front of a panel of industry professionals to determine the first, second, and third place winning teams.

The national CCIC is designed to enable community college students to discover and demonstrate their capacity to use STEM to make a difference in the world and to translate that knowledge into action.

SOURCE: https://www.challenge.gov

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National Institutes of Health $500K Prize for Ideas on How to Enhance Gender Diversity in Biomedical and Behavioral Science DEADLINE April 16

The Prize for Enhancing Faculty Gender Diversity seeks to recognize those institutions whose biomedical and behavioral science departments, centers, or divisions have achieved sustained improvement in gender diversity. Understanding that there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution to enhancing diversity in academia and that ideas based on evidence are necessary to achieve systemic change, this prize will acknowledge and recognize transformative approaches, systems, projects, programs, and processes that have successfully enhanced and sustained gender diversity within an institution…

We recognize that challenges are faced by all underrepresented groups. Women of color, who are at the intersection of gender and race/ethnicity, face unique obstacles and are especially underrepresented as biomedical faculty members and in the leadership ranks. Although this competition focuses on improving gender diversity broadly for all women, the NIH is also interested in institutional approaches that address the underrepresentation of faculty with intersecting identities.

Critical to this prize competition is the identification of best practices, the sharing of lessons learned, and the delineation of evidence-based approaches that can be broadly translated to, and replicated by, other institutions vis-à-vis an NIH-supported national toolkit. Submissions to this prize competition may inform the development of the toolkit, which will be designed to assist other institutions or academic groups with issues of inclusion and help to create environments that facilitate achievement. Because this prize competition recognizes achievement through approaches that have already been applied, such interventions must have been implemented prior to the launch date of this prize competition.

SOURCE: https://www.challenge.gov

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Collegiate Teams Solar Decathlon Architectural and Engineering Design Challenge DEADLINE April 15

The Solar Decathlon continues to “push the envelope” on the design of the high-performance, efficient, affordable, innovative buildings while leveraging opportunities to foster student innovation, STEM education, and workforce development opportunities.

Collegiate teams that compete in the annual Design Challenge create residential or commercial building designs that will be evaluated on how well they meet the nation’s rapidly evolving demand for innovative, cost-effective, quick-to-build, high-quality, resilient, grid-interconnected, efficient buildings that respond to targeted community needs. Beyond the residential and commercial building types that have been previously offered, the program is excited to add Retail Buildings to the mix. Teams can start planning now for the Solar Decathlon 2021 Design Challenge.

SOURCE: https://www.challenge.gov

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Pomeroy Fund for New York State History Grants for Museum and Historical Society Capital Budgets DEADLINE March 22

The Pomeroy Fund for NYS History is a partnership between the William G. Pomeroy Foundation and the Museum Association of New York (MANY). The Fund offers grant assistance to 501(c)(3) history-related organizations in New York State with budgets under $150,000.

In Round Four, a total of $50,000 will be distributed for capital needs in individual grants not to exceed $5,000.

Requests will be considered for technology equipment, facility maintenance equipment, furnishings, major material purchases, renovations, refurbishments, remodeling, and rehabilitation.

SOURCE: https://nysmuseums.org

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Virtual: The African American Intellectual History Society’s Sixth Annual Conference March 19-20

Keynote Speakers:

Robin D.G. Kelley and Tiya Miles

Author and historian Robin D.G. Kelley is one of the most distinguished experts on African American studies and a celebrated professor who has lectured at some of America’s highest learning institutions.

Tiya Miles is Professor of History and Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at Harvard University. She is a public historian, academic historian, and creative writer whose work explores the intersections of African American, Native American and women’s histories.

Featured Guest Speakers

Stanley Nelson is among the premier documentary filmmakers working today. His feature-length films combine compelling narratives with rich and deeply researched historical detail, shining new light on both familiar and under-explored aspects of the American past.

Etant Dupain is a journalist, filmmaker, and community organizer. For over a decade, he has worked as a producer on documentaries and for international news media outlets including Al Jazeera, TeleSur, BBC, CNN, Netflix, PBS, and Vice. Etant founded an alternative media project in Haiti to enable citizen journalists to provide access to information in Haitian Creole for and about internally-displaced people, aid accountability, and politics.

Featured Authors & Books

Thavolia Glymph, author of The Women’s Fight: The Civil War’s Battles for Home, Freedom, and Nation

Davarian L. Baldwin, author of In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower: How Universities Are Plundering Our Cities

Tiffany N. Florvil, author of Mobilizing Black Germany: Afro-German Women and the Making of a Transnational Movement

Tyler D. Parry, author of Jumping the Broom: The Surprising Multicultural Origins of a Black Wedding Ritual

William Sturkey, author of Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White

SOURCE: https://www.aaihs.org

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Virtual: Wetlands and Pollinators: How Water Quality Practices Can Benefit Pollinators Workshop March 31

Wetlands are vital–recognized for their importance in protecting water quality, enhancing agricultural production, strengthening community health, and providing wildlife habitat. This webinar highlights how wetland protection and restoration can also support pollinator and other beneficial insect conservation.

SOURCE: https://xerces.org

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Virtual: Effective Ways to Attract And Support Pollinators in Managed Landscapes Workshop March 24

Information provided will include best management practices for pollinators as well as information on plant selection for landscapers and other urban land managers.

SOURCE: https://xerces.org

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Virtual: Beneficial Invertebrates in Our Soil Workshop March 17

Healthy, living soil and its functions are created and maintained by fungi, bacteria, plants and by invertebrate animals as diverse as annelids, springtails, and firefly larvae, among others. Soil invertebrates are fundamental to soil health and create soil structure, cycle organic matter, consume weed seeds and predate crop pests. This workshop will familiarize participants with common soil invertebrates, their ecology and roles in soil health, scouting methods, and management strategies to increase beneficial soil animal populations.

SOURCE: https://xerces.org

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Virtual: Pollinators and Climate Change: Making an Impact on the Farm Workshop March 16

During this “farminar” hosted by the Practical Farmers of Iowa, learn more from Xerces Society climate change lead, Angela Laws, about how climate change impacts pollinators. Then hear from Sarah Nizzi, Xerces Society farm bill pollinator conservation planner and NRCS partner biologist, about the cost-share and technical assistance programs that can help you sustain pollinators on your farm.

SOURCE: https://xerces.org

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NEH Humanities Historical Research Grants DEADLINE May 18

The Research and Development program supports projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials.

This program supports projects at all stages of development, from early planning and stand-alone studies, to advanced implementation. Research and Development projects contribute to the evolving and expanding body of knowledge for heritage practitioners, and for that reason, outcomes may take many forms. Projects may produce any combination of laboratory datasets, guidelines for standards, open access software tools, workflow and equipment specifications, widely used metadata schema, or other products.

Research and Development supports work on the entire range of humanities collection types including, but not limited to, moving image and sound recordings, archaeological artifacts, born digital and time-based media, rare books and manuscripts, archival records, material culture, and art. Applicants must demonstrate how advances in preservation and access through a Research and Development project would benefit the cultural heritage community by supporting humanities research, teaching, or public programming.

SOURCE: https://www.neh.gov

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NEH Humanities Initiative Grants for Community Colleges DEADLINE May 20

Humanities Initiatives at Community Colleges strengthen the teaching and study of the humanities at community colleges by developing new humanities programs, resources (including those in digital format), or courses, or by enhancing existing ones.

Projects must be organized around a core topic or set of themes drawn from such areas of study in the humanities as history, philosophy, religion, literature, and composition and writing skills.

NEH welcomes applications for projects that are modest in scope, duration, and budget, as well as applications for expansive, long-term projects.

SOURCE: https://www.neh.gov

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NEH Humanities Initiative Grants for Colleges and Universities DEADLINE May 20

Humanities Initiatives at Colleges and Universities strengthen the teaching and study of the humanities at institutions of higher education by developing new humanities programs, resources (including those in digital format), or courses, or by enhancing existing ones.

Projects must be organized around a core topic or set of themes drawn from such areas of study in the humanities as history, philosophy, religion, literature, and composition and writing skills.

NEH welcomes applications for projects that are modest in scope, duration, and budget, as well as applications for expansive, long-term projects.

SOURCE: https://www.neh.gov

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Virtual: Beech Leaf Disease FREE Webinar March 9

Beech leaf disease (BLD) affects and kills both native and ornamental beech tree species. It is associated with a nematode, Litylenchus crenatae mccannii. This disease has only been discovered in recent years and much about it, including the full cause and how it spreads, is still unknown. Because of this, experts from The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station are collecting information and performing research in the hopes of learning more about the disease and how to control it.

SOURCE: https://www.bartlettarboretum.org

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Virtual: Bee City Series: Very Special(ist) Bees and the Flowers They Love Workshop March 16

Many bees are pollen specialists, collecting pollen from a single species, genus, or plant family. Despite knowing many of these plant-bee connections, we do not have good images of all these specialist bees. We would love your help documenting them and other invertebrates visiting their host plants. This program will highlight where to find specialist bee information–primarily for the eastern U.S.—and bee phenology information to guide your efforts. We will also discuss how you can help document wildlife via iNaturalist.org and Bugguide.net.

SOURCE: https://xerces.org

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Winter Tree ID Hike March 19 ~South Salem, NY~

No leaves, no problem—become a winter dendrology pro! Join our Director of Stewardship Brendan Murphy for an easy stroll through the Leon Levy Preserve. Enjoy the wintry landscape of this beautiful preserve that WLT helped protect (and holds the conservation easement on) and learn techniques for identifying trees in winter. About 1 mile on easy-moderate terrain.

SOURCE: https://westchesterlandtrust.org

Location: Leon Levy Preserve, 2-50 Smith Ridge Road, South Salem, NY